Insights into funding: Indian Department of Science and Technology

In recent years, Indian Research Institutes have significantly increased their influence in global rankings for research output; Indian research spending is approximately $70 billion annually.

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Indian research spending is approximately $70 billion annually.

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Introduction

In 2016, India spent 0.85% of its GDP on research and development. Although this may lag behind some of the research commitments of its Asian neighbours, (China spent 1.98% and South Korea lead the region with a significant investment of 4% of its GDP), it still represents a non-trivial funding amount of ~$70 Billion annually. In recent years, Indian Research Institutes have significantly increased their influence in global rankings for research output, with the Indian Institutes of Technology (IIT) now ranking 41 globally, and in the top 10 in the Asia-Pacific region [1].

DST Funding Overview

In this post, we’re focussing on funding opportunities from the Indian Department of Science and Technology (DST). The department has a multi-functional role that includes setting scientific policy, advising the government, supporting its 21 research institutions and…

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How a “flipped” gene helped butterflies evolve mimicry

Science Life

swallowtail butterflies Several different swallowtail butterfly variations showing mimicry and polymorphism, or different forms of the same species. In the center, a female Papilio polytes that mimics another species that is toxic to predators. (Credit: Matt Wood)

Female swallowtail butterflies do something a lot of butterflies do to survive: they mimic wing patterns, shapes and colors of other species that are toxic to predators. Some – but not all – swallowtail species have evolved several different forms of this trait. But what kind of genetic changes led to these various disguises, and why would some species maintain an undisguised form when mimicry provides an obvious evolutionary advantage?

In a new study published this week in Nature Communications, scientists from the University of Chicago analyze genetic data from a group of swallowtail species to find out when and how mimicry first evolved, and what has been driving those changes since then. It’s…

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Off Track: How Storms Will Veer in a Warmer World

Weizmann Institute of Science research uncovers the internal mechanisms driving storms toward the poles